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Use of cervical spine manipulation under anesthesia for management of cervical disk herniation, cervical radiculopathy, and associated cervicogenic headache syndrome

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Review

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Structural and chiropractic

J Manipulative Physiol Ther.1999 Mar-Apr;22(3):166-70.

Authors:

J Herzog

Abstract.

Objective: To demonstrate the benefits of cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia as an approach to treating a patient with chronic cervical disk herniation, associated cervical radiculopathy, and cervicogenic headache syndrome. Clinical features: The patient had neck pain with radiating paresthesia into the right upper extremity and incapacitating headaches and had no response to 6 months of conservative therapy. Treatment included spinal manipulative therapy, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, and acupuncture. Magnetic resonance imaging, electromyography, and somatosensory evoked potential examination all revealed positive diagnostic findings. Intervention and outcome: Treatment included 3 successive days of cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia. The patient had immediate relief after the first procedure. Her neck and arm pain were reported to be 50% better after the first trial, and her headaches were better by 80% after the third trial. Four months after the last procedure the patient reported a 95% improvement in her overall condition. Conclusion: Cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia has a place in the chiropractic arena. It is a useful tool for treating chronic discopathic disease complicated by cervical radiculopathy and cervicogenic headache syndrome. The beneficial results of this procedure are contingent on careful patient selection and proper training of qualified chiropractic physicians.

Publication Date: 

1999 Mar-Apr

OEID: 

4393

Herzog, J. (1999) 'Use of cervical spine manipulation under anesthesia for management of cervical disk herniation, cervical radiculopathy, and associated cervicogenic headache syndrome', J Manipulative Physiol Ther.1999 Mar-Apr;22(3):166-70.

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